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Yesterday afternoon, I had a couple of minutes to kill, so I pulled one of my old favorite books down off of the shelf: Barbara Ninde Byfield, The Book of Weird, in trade paperback, from 1973.


It came apart in my hands, mostly. The pages are cracking, the binding is shot. Shame. It was a thing of beauty, both the pictures and the prose. I think I can either read it again, maybe one more time period, or I can keep it, but I can't do both.

Tonight, before bed, I glanced over at John Scalzi's blog, and saw that he, too, had permanence vs. impermanence of books on his mind, the last couple of days: a lovely meditation on the pointlessness of trying to "write for the ages," and then a follow-up in which he gently picks a fight with Jonathan Franzen on the "permanence" and "solidity" of paper books vs e-books.

Ars longa, vita brevis, my ass.



Jan. 31st, 2012 04:34 pm (UTC)
I hope so! The planetary supply of lithium is running low because it's all going into batteries for portable electronics. At least recycle the batteries, darnit.
Jan. 31st, 2012 06:43 pm (UTC)
For a while, it got easier to recycle batteries, but more recently, it is getting harder again. Places to drop them off, are closing their doors and turning them away.

Edited at 2012-01-31 06:43 pm (UTC)
Feb. 1st, 2012 04:36 pm (UTC)
As of 2010, we're actually still using more lithium in glass/ceramic production than in batteries. [ref]